Heritage buildings – RMC Saint-Jean

The Administration Building No. 24 is part of a group of military school structures at the Royal Military College Saint-Jean. The solid brick building, built in 1937 to 1938, is a multi-windowed, two-storey, rectangular structure with a hip roof. The classically-inspired main façade has two symmetrically placed, recessed, pedimented entrance bays, and a roofline broken by two small pediments near the center. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Administration Building No. 24 is a recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental value. The Administrat ion Building No. 24 is closely associated with the reorganization of the militia in 1936 and represents the integration of French Canadians into the armed forces. The building was constructed as an administrative centre for the Department of National Defence’s military complex at St. Jean in 1937 and continued in this capacity when Collège Militaire Royal, the first bilingual college, was established on the site in 1952. The Administration Building No. 24 is valued for its very good, classically-inspired aesthetic design as demonstrated in the formal symmetry and decoration of the front (east) façade. Also a very good functionally-oriented design, the building’s interior layout speaks to its administrative role. The building materials, such as the brick for the walls, the concrete for the raised basement and the stone for the window sills are of very good quality. The Administration Building No. 24 rei n forces the present character of its military school setting at RMC Saint-Jean. The building is well-known to those who live and work in or frequent the complex.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/visit-visite/affichage-display.aspx?id=4768

The Gallisonnière Block / Supply Building 6 is one of a group of buildings located within the earthen ramparts of the former Fort Saint-Jean, now the Collège Militaire Royal. A hipped roof with four, formally aligned brick chimneys tops the large, rectangular building. Regularly spaced windows with minimal stonework, and three transomed entrances, enliven the solid brick walls. The building’s rear elevation features a tower. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Gallisonnière Block / Supply Building 6 is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental value. The Gallisonnière Block / Supply Building 6, as one of a group of buildings constructed within the walls of the former Fort Saint-Jean, is closely associated with an effort to improve the district’s defences following the 1837-1838 rebellion. Fort Saint-Jean remained an important military centre for the stationing of troops and supplies. The structure is also associated with a period of growth in the city’s commercial activity and its supporting railway, canal and bridge transportation links. One of the most significant stages in the development of the complex was its choice in 1952 as Canada’s third, and first francophone, military college. The Gallisonnière Block / Supply Building 6 is valued for its good aesthetic design whereby simplified vernacular forms influenced by British Classicism are evidenced in its rigid symmetry, rectangular form and classical proportions. The solid walls, constructed of brick laid in common bond, demonstrate good functional design. The stonework, such as the dressed foundation and the flat arches that span the regularly spaced windows, are also evidence of the building’s very good craftsmanship and materials. The Gallisonnière Block / Supply Building 6 reinforces the mid-19th century character of its former fort, now military school setting at Royal Military College Saint-Jean. The building is well-known to those who live, work and frequent the complex.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/visit-visite/affichage-display.aspx?id=4682

The Officer’s Mess / Building 5 is one of a group of buildings located within the earthen ramparts of the former Fort Saint-Jean, now the Royal Military College Saint Jean. The large, rectangular building with projecting end pavilions, built in 1839, is topped by a hipped roof with many brick chimneys. Regularly spaced windows with minimal stonework, and pedimented door openings, enliven the solid brick walls of the building. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Officer’s Mess is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building be cause of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental value. The Officer’s Mess, as one of a group of buildings constructed within the walls of the former Fort Saint-Jean in 1839, is closely associated with an effort to improve the district’s defences following the 1837-1838 rebellion. Fort Saint-Jean remained an important military centre for the stationing of troops and supplies. The structure is also associated with a period of growth in the city’s commercial activity and its supporting railway, canal and bridge transportation links. One of the most significant stages in the development of the complex was its choice in 1952 as Canada’s third, and first francophone, military college. The Officer’s Mess is valued for its good aesthetic design whereby simplified vernacular forms influenced by British Classicism are evidenced in its rigid symmetry, rectangular form and classical proportions. The solid walls of irregularly sized brick demonstrate a good functional design. The stonework, such as the dressed foundation, and the flat arches that span the regularly spaced windows, are also evidence of the building’s very good craftsmanship and materials. The Officer’s Mess reinforces the mid-19th century character of its former fort, now military school setting at the Royal Military College Saint Jean. The building is well-known to those who live, work and frequent the complex.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/visit-visite/affichage-display. a spx?id=10154&page=1

The Officer Cadet Dormitory, also known as CMR 4, Building No. 4 and Montcalm Barracks, is one of a group of buildings located within the earthen ramparts of the former Fort Saint-Jean, now the Collège Militaire Royal. The large, rectangular building is topped by a hipped roof with four, formally aligned brick chimneys. Regularly spaced windows with minimal stonework, and three transomed entrances, enliven the solid brick walls. The building’s rear elevation features a tower. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building. The Officer Cadet Dormitory is a Recognized Federal Heritage Building because of its historical associations, and its architectural and environmental value. The Officer Cadet Dormitory, as one of a group of buildings constructed within the walls of the former Fort Saint-Jean, is closely associated with an effort to improve the district’s defenses following the 1837-1838 rebellion. Fort Saint-Jean remained an important military centre for the stationing of troops and supplies. The structure is also associated with a period of growth in the city’s commercial activity and its supporting railway, canal and bridge transportation links. One of the most significant stages in the development of the complex was its choice in 1952 as Canada’s third, and first francophone, military college. The Officer Cadet Dormitory is valued for its good aesthetic design whereby simplified vernacular forms influenced by British Classicism are evidenced in its rigid symmetry, rectangular form and classical proportions. The solid walls constructed of brick laid in common bond, demonstrate good functional design. The stonework, such as the dressed foundation, and the flat arches that span the regularly spaced windows, are also evidence of the building’s very good craftsmanship and materials. The Officer Cadet Dormitory reinforces the mid-19th century character of its former fort, now military school setting at Collège Militaire Royal. The building is well known to those who live, work and frequent the complex.

http://www.historicplaces.ca/visit-visite/affichage-display.aspx?id=4498

Information compiled by E3161 Victoria Edwards (RMC ‘03)