In This Issue 19

Photo of the Week

Caption: Two Ex-Cadets On The Hill! 12192 Gen. Thomas Lawson, Chief of the Defence Staff, receives the last Canadian flag that flew at the end of the military mission in Afghanistan from 14596 Maj-Gen. Dean Milner, last Commander of the Canadian Contribution to the Training Mission in Afghanistan. The flag eventually made its way to the Commander In Chief, the Governor General.

A tip of the hat to the following members who just recently updated their Club membership status: Chapeau aux membres suivants qui ont tout récemment mis à jour leur adhésion au Club:

3378 Lorne C Smith; 3543 Walter Niemy; 3613 Barry A Culham; 3673 John Jory; 8099 William R (Roger) Bradley;12885 Pierre Beauséjour; 8515 Bill Harris.

Club Membership Info Join, Update or Renew ‘Now’

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Convocation, Sunset Ceremony & Grad Parade this week. 

UPDATE: Rick Mercer and Harky Smith to receive Honorary Doctorates

 

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

Royal Military College of Canada to Hold Convocation

KINGSTON, Ont. ─ Media are invited to Convocation Ceremonies at the Royal Military College of Canada on May 15, 2014.

The Honourable Robert Nicholson, Minister of National Defence and Chancellor of the Royal Military College of Canada, will present more than 300 graduating students with their Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctorate’s degrees. Two Honorary Doctorates will also be presented to: Mr. Rick Mercer, Canadian comedian, television personality and celebrated author; and Colonel (Retired) Arthur Harcourt Carington (Harky) Smith. Colonel (Retired) Smith belongs to the Order of Military Merit and in 2010, he received the Public Service of Canada Award for excellence for having served in the Department of National Defence for over 57 years. He was also invested into the prestigious Order of Saint George, in October 2011.

WHEN: Thursday, May 15, 2014, at 1 p.m.

WHERE: Kingston Military Community Sports Centre’s Anderson Field House,

Highway 2, Kingston

Media are asked to be in place by 12:45 p.m.

AVIS AUX MÉDIAS

Remise de diplômes au Collège militaire royal du Canada

KINGSTON (Ontario) ─ Les médias sont invités aux cérémonies de remise de diplômes au Collège militaire royal du Canada le 15 mai 2014.

L’honorable Robert Nicholson, ministre de la Défense nationale, et chancelier du Collège militaire royal du Canada, remettra des diplômes plus que 300 finissants du baccalauréat, de la maîtrise et du doctorat. Deux doctorats honorifiques seront également remis à M. Rick Mercer, comédien, personnalité de la télévision et auteur de renom canadien, ainsi qu’au colonel Arthur Harcourt Carington (Harky) Smith, M.M.M., S.B.St.J., CD. Le colonel Smith est membre de l’Ordre du mérite militaire. En 2010, il a reçu un Prix d’excellence de la fonction publique du Canada pour avoir servi plus de 57 ans au ministère de la Défense. En Octobre 2011, il a été admis dans le prestigieux Ordre de Saint-Georges.

QUAND : Le jeudi 15 mai 2014, à 13 h. Les représentants des médias doivent être installés à 12 h 45 au plus tard.

OÙ : Complexe sportif Anderson, Centre sportif de la communauté militaire de Kingston, route 2, Kingston

In This Issue 19:

Soldier On Relay stops at RMCC

National Day of Honour: Three Cadets Share Their Memories

Two New Inductees for Wall of Honour: 749 Crerar & 13738 Hadfield

Communiqué from the Commandant RMCC – Communiqué du commandant du CMRC

Claude Scilley In Conversation With 15936 Mike Ashcroft

Ex-Cadets In the News & More

Good Crowd for 14444 Dorothy Hector Talk & AGM

The Arctic Adventure – With the RMCC Connection

Dr. David Baird: Preserving the Past

Training for the “M” & Countdown On For Grad Parade

Bilan sportif CMR Saint-Jean 2013-14

Royal Roads Paverstone Project

Careers / Carrières

Deaths | Décès

 

ENCORE:

Business Section

QUOTE(S) OF THE WEEK

Morale Building Quotes from Georgy Zhukov (1896 – 1974), Marshall of the Soviet Union:

“It is a fact that under equal conditions, large-scale battles and whole wars are won by troops which has a strong will for victory, clear goals before them, high moral standards, and devotion to the banner under which they go into battle.”

“We will do all we can to insure peace, but if war is imposed upon us we will be together shoulder-to-shoulder as in the last war to strive for the happiness of mankind.”

“Here they found real war, but they were not ready for it. They were used to easy victories. This deprived them of flexibility on one hand, of tenacity on the other. For them, war was merely manoeuvres. They have neither cavalry nor skiers, and their tanks cannot pass over the snow.”

– Speaking of the German Army in Russia, 1944.

Georgy Zhukov

Born to a peasant family in Strelkova, Russia, Zhukov quickly became a military man, entering Russia’s army in 1915. By the time he joined the Red Army in 1918, he was a decorated veteran of World War I; he later fought in the Russian Civil War . Zhukov rose through the military ranks and studied his trade at Frunze Military Academy, graduating in 1931. Not only did he escape Joseph Stalin’s purge of the Red Army leadership in the 1930s, that “ Great Terror ”allowed Zhukov to further advance.

By 1939, Zhukov commanded the Soviet forces in Mongolia where he oversaw the fighting during the Nomonhan Incident (Khalkhin Gol). In this border dispute between a Soviet-Mongolian force and Japanese troops, Zhukov’s army crushed the Japanese. He soon became a general and in January 1941, he was appointed as the Red Army’s chief of staff. Stalin removed him from this position in July, but Zhukov remained a member of the Stavka, or military strategic planning committee.

During World War II, Zhukov became one of Stalin’s most trusted and dependable generals. He organized the defense of Leningrad (September 1941), after which he became the commander in chief on the Soviet Union’s western front. Zhukov had a hand in directing the successful defense of Moscow (1941–1942), the Battle of Stalingrad (1942–1943), the Battle of Kursk (1943), and the Battle for Berlin (1945). He accepted the German surrender for the Soviet Union in his Berlin headquarters on May 9, 1945. The following month, he led the Soviet victory parade in Moscow after an injury prevented Stalin from doing so.

Zhukov finished the war highly decorated and extremely popular—he was seen as a hero by the Soviet people—and this began to worry Stalin, who quickly began relegating him to less prominent positions. For a time, Zhukov stayed in Germany to oversee the Soviet occupation zone and represented the USSR on the Allied Control Commission . Beginning in 1946, Stalin assigned him to command posts in remote districts (Odessa and the Urals) in a semi-exile. He did not regain power until after Stalin’s death in 1953, when he worked his way up to minister of defense under Nikita Khrushchev . But he soon had a falling out with Khrushchev and was stripped of his positions in the government and party late in 1957. His career at an end, Zhukov took to writing personal and military memoirs; he died in 1974.

One Comment

  • Richard Ronholm

    May 12, 2014 at 3:44 pm

    I read one of his books and studied the Battle of Kursk during my time at RMC. He had an easy to read writing style (although some of that may be due to the interpreter.)

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