Leaders of tomorrow have their say

Leaders of tomorrow have their say…

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26664 OCdt (IV) Zacharie Marshall – AERE  – Degree program: Aeronautical Engineering;

26621 NCdt (IV) Sarah Kelly – MARS – Degree program:  Business Administration; and

26613 OCdt (IV) Kyra Smith – CELE,  Degree program: Electrical Engineering

 

They share:

most favourable & disappointing memories of their time at RMCC; what changes they would like to see at RMCC and much, more

 

MORE

 

26664 OCdt (IV) Zacharie Marshall – AERE  – Degree program: Aeronautical Engineering

What were your inspiration & motivation to attend RMCC?

When it came time for me to decide where to go after CEGEP, none of the regular options really interested me. When I found out about the college, I knew that it would introduce me to a whole new world of experiences and give me the challenge I was searching for.

What is your most favourable memory of your time at RMCC?

My most favourable memory is not just one, but any moment I got to hang out with my friends. Especially after a busy week with school and military obligations, it was always nice to relax and catch up with friends. My RMC friends are what I believe really made my experience at the college the great experience it was.

What is your most disappointing memory of your time at RMCC?

With everything going on at the college, my most disappointing memory is every choice I had to make because of lack of time. I only wish there were more hours in the day so that I could have experienced more.

What changes would you like to see at RMCC which would make it a better overall experience for those who will be following you?

I believe that it would be beneficial for future cadets if the college was run as a simulated unit, instead of a four year course. I believe it would better prepare cadets for the real world challenges of the CAF.

Which senior cadet(s) influenced you most as a I, II, III Year and how? 

Two names come to mind. First, my FYOP CFL, Amy Clements, was a big influence, always pushing me and the other first years and always expecting the best from us. As well, another FYOP staff, Anthony Poirier, was a big influence as well. At the time, he was a third year student in aeronautical engineering. Seeing him succeed in many aspects of the college, including academics, motivated me to do as well as I could.

What– in your opinion– makes a good leader?

A good leader is someone who does what is needed to get the job done without forgetting was is best for his or her people. It is unfortunate how often the well-being of subordinates is forgotten all in the name of completing a task.

What does TDV mean to you?

Truth, Duty, Valour is not just something related to RMC, but something that should be integrated into every day life.

What is your ultimate goal after leaving RMCC?

For now, my goal is to successfully complete my degree. Once I finish RMCC, I look forward to moving on to new things and searching for new goals to strive for.

One last point.

I’ve found that a good sense of humour can always help, especially in difficult situations.

***

26621 NCdt (IV) Sarah Kelly – MARS – Degree program is Business Administration

What were your inspiration & motivation to attend RMCC?

I knew that I wanted to join the military after being in sea cadets in Lower Sackville, NS for 7 years. I reached the rank of Chief Petty Officer 1st Class. I didn’t necessarily know that I wanted to be an officer or go to RMCC but when I applied NCM they told me based on my reference I should apply for RMCC. So I took the chance and got accepted. How can you turn down an opportunity like RMCC.

What is your most favourable memory of your time at RMCC?

My most favourable memory of my time at RMCC has to be obstacle course day. Since I am from Nova Scotia, I figured my parents could not make it down for reunion weekend because of work and travel. Every time the topic came up they agreed that they probably will not be able to make it. That day as I am walking into the mess hall for lunch right before obstacle course I see my parents standing outside Fort Lasalle. I ran over to them crying with tears of happiness that they made it and as my flight and FYOP staff describe, it was like a scene out of a real movie. Completing the obstacle course that day with my parents cheering me on from the sidelines has to be the most memorable time at RMCC.

What is your most disappointing memory of your time at RMCC?

My most disappointing memory of my time at RMCC was the day I thought I wanted to leave. I am a person who never gives up but when thanksgiving weekend came around I became very homesick. This would be the first year I would be away from my family for holidays. That is one of the sacrifices that you need to make when joining the CAF. I spoke to them on the phone all the time and they always reminded me how strong I am and that I have never been a quitter. One of my FYOP staff that lived in Kingston took the west coast flight mate and me to his house near Kingston for thanksgiving dinner. It was a very nice to be around any family and when you are at RMCC long enough this is your family, especially all the east and west coasters who are always stuck around for long weekends. This has to be my most disappointing day at RMCC because it is the day I wanted to give up.

What changes would you like to see at RMCC which would make it a better overall experience for those who will be following you?

The one suggestion I have to help make RMCC a better experience for everyone behind me is for the staff to listen to the cadets. A lot of easy changes can be made to help make RMCC a better experience. There is no reason that morale should be so low at such a great institution. I want morale increased so that we do not have to worry about getting people help after the fact.

Which senior cadet(s) influenced you most as a I, II, III Year and how?

I have a few cadets who have influenced me over my years here at RMCC. The cadets who influence me are the ones who go out of their way or beyond their job to help others. The ones who always make an effort to say hello when they see you. It is great knowing that people on your level and higher care about you and try their best to make this place better for everyone as they will do in the future at their unit. Some of the cadets who have influenced me over the years to name a few would be OCdt Kyle Ryan-9 Sqn, OCdt Ali Mansour -7 Sqn, OCdt Denice Zoretich – 9 Sqn. These individuals have all done their own part in helping people and making this a better place to be. I cannot forget to mention the cadets from the US Military academies at USMA, USNA and USAFA that have also influenced me. Learning about their values and how different they do things in the US than we do in our Canadian military helps us all grow as people to be able to share those experiences with our future of the CAF.

What– in your opinion– makes a good leader?

In my opinion what makes a good leader is someone who respects and trusts their subordinates and someone who can gain the trust of their subordinates. These are two important aspects to have as a leader to be able to be an effective leader. Someone that knows how to have fun but that knows where to draw the line between chill and professional.

What does TDV mean to you?

To me, TDV means what it is intended to mean. It is a stepping stone motto to help you grow through RMC to make you a great leader in the future upon graduation. Being truthful and honest like I said previously is something that gets you respect and can help you in becoming a great leader. Duty is important to any leader. You will always have tasks or missions you need to accomplish and taking care of your duties and accomplishing tasks gives you the experience to learn, sometimes from your mistakes and to grow and be stronger for the future. Valour can encompass many other words such as determination, courage and bravery. Understanding what this word means to you by the time you graduate RMC will give you the understanding of what kind of leader you may be in the future.

What is your ultimate goal after leaving RMCC?

My ultimate goal after leaving RMC is to dive into my trade specific phase training to really understand what my future and life is going to be like. Keeping in mind all the lessons I learned and mistakes I made while at RMC will help me to accomplish greater things upon graduation. One goal that may take a lot of work is to squash the negative reputation of MARS officers by being the best I can be.

One last point.

The challenges that I have gone through while attending RMC for my four years have changed me dramatically. I have changed in a number of ways. You are the one that chooses who you are and what kind of person you want to be.

Take the challenges you face and tackle them with everything that you believe in such as your morals and values.

I came here as a fighter and at many points wanted to quit and give up because I didn’t believe in myself because I forgot what I believed in and why I was here.

If you have to print your values and what you want for yourself and tape it up on your wall so you can see it everyday to remind you of your goals than print it big and never forget who you are and who you want to be.

Life isn’t easy and it is always changing just like you will. You have to work for what you want. When you achieve something you have worked for on your own makes it so much better than having something handed to you.

***

26613 OCdt (IV) Kyra Smith – CELE,  Degree program is Electrical Engineering

What were your inspiration & motivation to attend RMCC?

a. My grandfather, you may know him as 3378 LC Smith, class of 1955 (photo right). Growing up he had many stories about this place, and still keeps in contact with all the people he met here. I wanted to have a unique university experience, and a meaningful career, and RMC seemed perfect for me.

What is your most favourable memory of your time at RMCC?

a. Goofing off with my squadron. Especially my first year room mate. We have so many stories that I will continue to remember for the rest of my days. The bonds that I have made with my squadron mates and the friends that I will have forever. I really loved being on the highland dance team, and going on weekend exchanges with the USA academies.

What is your most disappointing memory of your time at RMCC

Being pulled from Nijmegen for a summer OJT instead because of trade requirements, and losing the privilege to wear dresses to Christmas Ball. It was always lots of fun dressing up and feeling like a girl for one night.

What changes would you like to see at RMCC which would make it a better overall experience for those who will be following you?

More opportunity to have hands on experience with military equipment.I think it would really benefit cadets to get some more experience with military equipment and trade related activities.

Which senior cadet(s) influenced you most as a I, II, III Year and how?

My FYOP staff ; Tucker Densmore, Carter Powis, Colin Cook, Andrew Jarvis, and Marc-Antoine Pelletier.They were my first introduction to older cadets, and definitely left a lasting impression, all in their own ways. Tucker showed me how important your subordinates are, and demonstrated true dedication to us first years as our CFL. Carter and Colin always had an open ear to help me when times were getting rough, always supportive and probably the reason I did not VR in first year. Andrew was an inspiration of fitness, and gave me the push I needed to try a little harder every-time I go to the gym. Marc-Antoine rose from a CSC in my first year to the CWC in my second year, he was a great mentor and someone I really respected. A couple other cadets in my trade were always there answering my questions and giving me tips; Justin Urqhart and Shae Luhowy. Most of members in my squadron above me were always there to support and help, especially Geoff Blandford and Jackson Doucet, who I still keep in contact with to this day.

What– in your opinion– makes a good leader?

Honesty, trust and intuition. A good leader needs to be someone that can be looked up to, and can be trusted to have the best interest of his/her subordinates, even at the cost of their own priorities. Someone that you can trust to do the right thing even when no one is looking, and when thrown into a shitty situation, has enough skill, knowledge and intuition that they can still get the mission done, and keep his/her people as safe and prepared as possible.

What does TDV mean to you?

To me it means being a good person, someone who can always be counted on to do the right thing, no matter who is watching. I would say that someone that displays TDV is a good leader, and is someone that embodies the values mentioned above.

What is your ultimate goal after leaving RMCC?

I hope to become an astronaut one day. I would love to be able to take my adventurous nature to a whole new level, and explore not only the world but the universe.

One last point.

I’m a 4th year, electrical engineer student on the highland dance team. I love the opportunities that RMC offers me. This year alone I have gone to the USA Naval academy for dance, I’ve seen two plays in Stratford with the English department, and I am scheduled to go on the Battle Field tour over reading week. In between all of this, I’m still trying to find time to finish my engineering project and pass my classes, stay in shape and keep my profile. RMC is a busy place, but a place where I have become who I am, and I love everything I have been offered.

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