We Remember


Four Ex Cadets who died in Afghanistan

22458 Nichola Goddard; 22596 Matthew Dawe; 23513 Kenneth O’Quinn; 22007 Michelle Mendes

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Memorial Arch

John M. Lyle of Toronto designed this commanding arch, erected by the RMC Club of Canada. His Excellency the Viscount Byng of Vimy, Governor-General of Canada, laid the foundation stone on 25 june 1923. In june of 1924 , it was unveiled by Mrs. Joshua Wright, dedicated by the Right Rev. CR. Bidwell, Lord Bishop of Ontario, and was handed over to the Hon. E.E. MacDonald, President of the College, by the President of the RMC Club, No. 140 Brig. G.L. Cartwright, CB, CMG, DSO.

The main arch is of buff Indiana limestone with a base of Quebec granite. Within the archway, on each side, are set two large bronze tablets on which are inscribed the names of Ex-Cadets who fell in the First Great War or previous wars. Two panels on the outer sides of the Arch display the names of the engagements in which Ex-Cadets lost their lives.

In keeping with the custom of saluting War Memorials, cadets salute (if in civilian attire, they check their arms) as they pass by or through the Memorial Arch.

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On Reflections of the First Remembrance Day Without Canadian WWI Veterans

We Remember WWI

Researched by E3161 Victoria Edwards (RMC 2003)

1123 Second Lieutenant Robert Leighton Moore Ferrie (RMC 1915);

1073 Lieut. Geoffrey Crosier Hilliard (RMC 1914);

908 Lieut. Francis Malloch Gibson (RMC 1911);

1277 2nd Lieut William Kellock Domville (RMC 1916);

1070 Captain Frederick Pole Daw (RMC 1914);

676 Captain Robert Clifford Darling (RMC 1904-1907);

932 Lieutenant Richard Gilpin Crawford (RMC 1913);

1156 Second Lieutenant Malcolm Charlton Crerar (RMC 1915);

658 Major Kenneth Burpee Carruthers (RMC 1904);

1214 Second Lieutenant Osbert Leveson Calverley (RMC 1915);

1123 Second Lieutenant Robert Leighton Moore Ferrie (RMC 1915) R. F. C. 46th Squadron was born Oct. 7th, 1898, the son of Robert Bown Ferrie, of Hamilton, Ontario. He studied at Highfield 1907-15 where he earned the Governor-General’s Medal, 1915, the Lieut.-Governor’s Medal, 1915.

He studied at Royal Military College of Canada in 1915, where he was Company Sergeant-Major; Light-Weight Boxing Champion; and Football Captain. He served with the Royal Flying Corps 46th Squadron. He was awarded a Military Cross (MC). “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his flight with great skill and determination in very bad weather, and dropped bombs on an enemy aerodrome from a height of 400 ft., destroying one shed and badly damaging another. On two later occasions he bombed villages and attacked enemy infantry with his machine-gun from a low altitude. He has brought down two enemy machines and assisted in destroying others.

He has shown great courage and resource at all times.“ (Jul 11, 1918) He fell in action on Jan. 3rd, 1918 at 19 years of age. His gravemarker, #5 Izel-Les-Hameau Communal

Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France, states that he is of the Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario. He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Hillfield-Strathallan College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, All Saints’ Anglican Church Memorial Plaque and on page 586 in the First World War Book of Remembrance. Also see `Echoes that Remain` by M.B. (Barry) Wansbrough, (2001 Hillfield Strathallan College)

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1073 Lieut. Geoffrey Crosier Hilliard (RMC 1914) was born March 17, 1897, the son of George B. and Amy H. Hilliard, of Lakefield. He studied at Highfield 1913-14 and at the Royal Military College of Canada 1914-15.

He served with the Royal Canadian Dragoons. Geoffrey Hilliard was one of the noblest type of young man. His strong face, strong physique and strong, clean soul endeared him to the best of his comrades at Highfield, at the RMC, and in the Royal Canadian Dragoons, with whom his military life was spent. He died of wounds December 11th, 1917 at 20 years of age. His grave is XXVIII. D. 5. Etaples Military Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France.

He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Hillfield-Strathallan College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, and on page 256 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. Also see `Echoes that Remain` by M.B. (Barry) Wansbrough, (2001 Hillfield Strathallan College).

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908 Lieut. Francis Malloch Gibson (RMC 1911) was born 11th June 1893, the youngest son of Maj. Gen. Sir John M. Gibson, K.C.M.G., and Lady Gibson, of Ravenscliffe, Hamilton, Ontario. He studied at Highfield in 1908 and entered R.M.C. Sept. 1911.

Frank Gibson had a brilliant career at School, winning a high place in the R.M.C. examination and the Governor-General’s medal for Proficiency. He was a good athlete and a clever marksman. R.M.C. had fitted him for a soldier’s life, and he gave to his country the full benefit of his complete training undiminished by the enervating influences of a civilian life. He served with the 15th Battalion, 48th Highlanders, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment).

He was Killed in Action on August 19, 1915 at 22 years of age near Armentieres. He was buried in IX. C. 2. Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery in Nord, France. He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Hillfield-Strathallan College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, the Osgood Hall Memorial Tablet, the Gibson family memorial and Page 16 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. Also see `Echoes that Remain` by M.B. (Barry) Wansbrough, (2001 Hillfield Strathallan College).

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1277 2nd Lieut William Kellock Domville (RMC 1916) was born March 2nd, 1899  son of Lieutenant-Colonel Percy Domville and of Mrs. Domville, of Westmount, Quebec. He studied at Hillfield-Strathallan College in Hamilton (1910-16) and at the Royal Military College of Canada (1916).

He served as an instructor with the Royal Air Force. He died in Kingston from the effects of a fall on Jul 7, 1918 at 20 years of age. Lieutenant Domville was engaged in duties that were both responsible and hazardous, and the fact that he was chosen as an instructor bears testimony to his skill and reliability.

Though he has not had the glorious privilege of facing the enemy, he has just as certainly given his young life for the Empire as if he had fallen in France. His grave is 709 1/2. Blk. N., Hamilton Cemetery, Hamilton, Ontario. He is commemorated on the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, with an All Saints’ Anglican Church Memorial Plaque (Hamilton) and on page 586 of the First World War Book of

Remembrance. Also see M.B. (Barry) Wansbrough `Echoes that Remain` (Hamilton, Ontario Hillfied-Strathallan College 2001)

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1070 Captain Frederick Pole Daw (RMC 1914) was the son of Major (Rev.) Samuel, chaplain of the 120th Battalion and Jessie Daw, of Hamilton, Ontario. He studied at the Royal Military College of Canada.

He had served at Gallipoli and in Egypt and was later sent to France. He served with the Worcestershire Regiment Division: 4th Bn. His brother, Lieutenant Herbert Daw was also killed, several months before Frederick. Frederick Daw was Killed In Action on October 18, 1916. His grave is in IX. L. 18 in the Bancourt British Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France. He is commemorated on the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada and on page 570 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

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676 Captain Robert Clifford Darling (RMC 1904-1907) was the son of Mrs. Annie M. Darling, of Toronto, Ontario. He studied at Upper Canada College and the Royal Military College of Canada. He was the proprietor of Robert Darling & Co of Toronto. He was the husband of Phyllis A. Darling of Toronto, Ontario.

He enlisted on August 4, 1914. He served as Adjutant, 48th Highlanders Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment), 15th Bn, 3rd brigade. He served in France in February 11, 1915. He was wounded in action on the 23rd of March near Neuve Chapelle France. He died in London, England on April 19, 1915 at 26 years of age. He was buried with military honours in Sec. V. Lot 89 of the Toronto Mount Pleasant Cemetery. He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Upper Canada College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada and on page 11 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

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932 Lieutenant Richard Gilpin Crawford (RMC 1913) was the son of William C. Crawford, a merchant and Annie Gilpin Crawford, of Chatham, Ontario.

He studied at Upper Canada College and the Royal Military College of Canada. He enlisted in August 17, 1914. He served as a Lt with the Essex Fusiliers. He served with the Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment). He served in France during the Great War. He was Mentioned in Despatches (Nov 20 1915) by Field Marshall Sir John French for gallant and distinguished service in the field.

He was wounded on May 8th, 1915 at the battle of Belle Waarde Lake and died of wounds on May 9th 1915 at No. 2 Sta Hospital at 23 years of age. He was buried in Grave I. 10 in the Bailleul Communal Cemetery in Nord, France. He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Upper Canada College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, and on Page 10 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

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1156 Second Lieutenant Malcolm Charlton Crerar (RMC 1915) was the son of Peter Duncan Crerar, K.C., and Marion Elizabeth Crerar, of Hamilton, Ontario. He studied at Highfield College, Upper Canada College and the Royal Military College of Canada. At RMC, he secured his commission with the Royal Field Artillery. He enlisted on May 1916.

He crossed to England in September 1917. He served as a Flight Lieutenant in Palestine in January 1917 during the Great War. He died on August 3, 1917 at 19 years of age of injuries received in a flying accident when in pursuit of an enemy aeroplane in the Gaza district, Palestine. His grave is D. 34 in the Deir El Belah War Cemetery in Israel.

He is commemorated on the Memorial Tablet at Upper Canada College, the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada and on page 576 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. His brothers were Lieutenant A.J. Crerar of the Royal Canadian Dragoons in France and Major H.B. Crerar D.S.O. in the Third Artillery Brigade in France.

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658 Major Kenneth Burpee Carruthers (RMC 1904) was born at Kingston, Ontario on June 30th, 1885. He studied at the Royal Military College of Canada. He earned a B.Sc from McGill University in 1908.

He was appointed Captain in the Canadian Field Artillery, 26th Battery. on June 2nd 1915. He transferred to the 20th Battery with the rank of Major. He was Mentioned in Despatches. He served in France during the Great War.

He was wounded on May 3rd, 1917. He was killed in action at Passchendaele on October 28, 1917. His grave reference is XI. E. 7. in the Vlamertinghe New Military Cermetery in Belgium. He is commemorated on the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, and on page 213 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

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1214 Second Lieutenant Osbert Leveson Calverley (RMC 1915) was the son of Maj. E. L. Calverley, staff major of the B.E.F. and Mrs. Sybil Maitland Calverley. He was born in England. He studied at Appleby College in Oakville and at the Royal Military College of Canada.

He served as a flight officer with the Royal Air Force, 124th Sqdn. He went to Britain in January 1918. He died during the Great War on July 12, 1918 at 19 years of age. His grave reference is C. 3551, Cambridge City Cemetery, Cambridgeshire,United Kingdom. He is commemorated on the Memorial Arch at the Royal Military College of Canada, the Appleby College Honour Roll, and on Page 584 of the First World War Book of Remembrance.

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3 Comments

  • Lionel Boxer

    November 8, 2010 at 5:19 pm

    I seem to recall CWO Darling (a recent RSM at the 48 Highlanders) telling me that he is related to 676 Captain Robert Clifford Darling and that a number of Darlings have served in the 48th Highlanders.

  • Robert G Darling

    October 17, 2012 at 12:08 pm

    CWO Bill Darling CD is a great great nephew of Clifford’s and is still serving in the Reserves. He started as a Highlander and was promoted through the ranks to RSM (CWO)
    Col C Warren Darling VD, Clifford’s brother, served with the 48th for his whole career as CO of the home battalion during WWI and first CO on re-org after the War
    1783 WWG Darling DSO, ED, Clifford’s nephew and Warren’s son, joined the 48th on graduation from RMC and served continuously until 1949 except for war time service with IV PLDG (Commanded in Italy). Was CO 48th 1946 – 1949. Hon Colonel 48th in early 70’s.
    LCol Robert G Darling CD, great nephew of Clifford, son of Bill, served in the 48th from 1959 to 1973(DCO) and HCol 2005 – 2007. CO A&SHofC 1975 – 1977

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