1914 – 1918 Vigil

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At sunset November 4th through to sunrise November 11th, THIS SITE will present a vigil commemorating the 68,000 Canadians who lost their lives in WWI. The names of the 68,000 war dead will be projected over a week of nights onto the National War Memorial in Ottawa, buildings in other regions of Canada and onto the side of Canada House in Trafalgar Square in London, England.

Du coucher du soleil le 4 novembre jusqu’au 11 novembre, CE SITE présentera la veille commémorant les quelque 68 000 Canadiens et Canadiennes qui ont perdu la vie au cours de la PGM. Le nom des 68 000 morts à la guerre sera projeté le soir pendant une semaine sur le Monument commémoratif de guerre du Canada à Ottawa, sur d’autres édifices dans d’autres régions du pays et sur le côté de Canada House à la place Trafalgar de Londres (Angleterre).

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st-john-amb.jpgRemembrance Day 2008 and 2009 are significant for one voluntary organization in the Kingston and Quinte region. This unique charitable organization, St. John Ambulance (SJA) traces its historical roots back to over 900 years of global service. This year, St. John celebrates the 125th anniversary of service to Canada during war and peacetime. In
2009, Ontario will celebrate the 125th anniversary of service to our province. This military association dates back to the Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, the second first aid course to be conducted in Canada and the first in Ontario. In 1884, the records indicate Canada was one of the first countries to recognize the value of first aid
training for the armed forces. During WW I, SJA members served in all theatres of war. In total, 432 Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachments (VADs) served overseas. By the end of 1919, all but 21 had returned to Canada; they remained in England, continuing to serve wounded soldiers. During WW II, SJA had 221 VADs serving overseas as nursing assistants, ambulance drivers and clerical staff. The first 73 VADs in Canada were allotted to the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals in 1944.

Many members were killed in action, received injuries or died of diseases. Today, St. John Ambulance Kingston Branch continues to serve in their memory. We will remember them.

Gary R. Hayes CD, PLCGS Vice Chair Standards Kingston Branch St. John Ambulance