Alumni Making the News

Editor’s Note: The articles included below do not represent all military college alumni in the news. If you know of a news-worthy individual that we missed or you’d like to add a story of your own, please contact us at Anna-Michelle.Shewfelt@rmc.ca. Thank you. // Note de l’éditrice: Les articles inclus ci-dessous ne représentent pas tous les anciens étudiants des collèges militaires dans les nouvelles. Si vous connaissez une personne digne des nouvelles que nous avons manquée ou si vous souhaitez ajouter une histoire de votre choix, contactez-nous à Anna-Michelle.Shewfelt@rmc.ca. Merci.

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Ukrainian ambassador bestows honour, unveils sculpture in Kingston

Lubomyr Luciuk, professor of political geography at RMC

Article

WINE EVENT TURNS DONATIONS INTO MEALS

Lubomyr Luciuk, professor of political geography at RMC

Article

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Jennie Carignan prend officiellement le commandement de la mission de l’OTAN en Irak

17312 Jennie Carignan

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Male-dominated Iraqi military getting used to female soldiers: Canadian general

17125 Dany Fortin / 17312 Jennie Carignan

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How a military vet built this iconic Canadian recruitment firm

15737 Bryan Brulotte

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CF Snowbirds aircraft returning home to Moose Jaw

19520 Mike French

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Top Aces credits RCAF experience for USAF adversary air contract

17428 Paul Bouchard

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Veterans Affairs rejects pitch for social media influencers in $7M outreach contract

15488 Sean Bruyea

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Putting Some Navy Back in the Royal Military College

6604 Jim Carruthers

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First female UN peacekeeper recounts harrowing Guatemalan mission for Oakville Museum crowd

18866 Eva Martinez

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Thousands of cards arrive for Canadian Armed Forces troops after social media appeal

26573 Denice Zoretich

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With Mali over, Canada’s peacekeeping contribution returns to historic lows

Walter Dorn, Professor of Defence Studies, Royal Military College and the Canadian Forces College

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‘Agility, skill, leadership’: Edmonton-based soldiers sharp for domestic calls too

21293 Bob Ritchie

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Prime minister’s aircraft grounded after hangar accident

22644 Steve Neta

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‘We are in active daily crisis,’ Defence chief says

15696 Jonathan Vance

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Australia and partner nations conclude Exercise DUGONG 19

25409 Slava Khabian

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Donna Wood – 30 Years Later

16002 Donna Wood

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3 Comments

  • 4588 ROBERT LOUIS KOMPF

    December 10, 2019 at 9:47 pm

    More Navy or More Reality?

    Singling out the aspirants of “The Silent Service” for something that provides better nourishment to mould them into more effective members afloat is a starting point.

    Navy First:
    Naval history, social events and lectures could provide some opportunity through osmosis for acquiring some notions of things Navy.

    Light Blue:
    Having a Cadet Wing, Squadrons and Flights doesn’t contribute much to readying the mind or body for War in aerospace.

    Grunts:
    Getting to wear CADPAT or even having such available during the academic year falls far short of preparing for “boots on the ground” anywhere.

    All:
    DEU at best contributes superficial, but essential, orientation to the environment in which the aspirants will SERVE TO DEFEND CANADA!

    The current Tri-Service, One Force or Unified formative training focuses on the BMOQ and Language training.This provides a useful starting point. BUT at the expense of early MOC training. Time cannot be stretched to accommodate everything right away.

    The Dim Past:
    My preparation prior to arrival in 1955 was the two days of selection interviews and tests and whatever experiences had occurred during the 18 years of my small town and farm life. The Military had a brief glimpse and then, like my classmates, I was thrown into the maw / vortex of CSC. French was a required academic course in First and Second Year with no particular understanding that it would be used or useful in the future.

    MOC training for all three services took place during the summer months (approximately 3 X 12 weeks) following 1st, 2nd and 3rd Years resulting, in general, that on graduation we were prepared, if not ready, for employment or further MOC training.

    The Infantry training (MOC23) was then based on a COTC curriculum . Phase One: train to be a private. (120 training periods starting with “Attention!’ was somewhat overkill for a platoon entirely from CSC. Our marching “About Turn” was one pace more than the Infantry norm.) Ph 2: be a Corporal – Instructor. Ph 3: More weapons and YOTC. There was no apparent connection and, perhaps, a wide gulf (not found on any Navy map) between the summer (ARMY) life and the winter (RMC) life. Talk about two solitudes!

    At present it is rumoured that some don’t start MOC until after graduation. Must be frustrating!

    So how to bolster / inculcate MOC awareness and competence?

    Here is a notion! After the Second Academic Year insert a Practicum Year (approximately 15 months) that includes any necessary language training, but is primarily devoted to MOC training. Exposure to real ship or land or air unit experience might prove enlightening and add a blast of reality. Spend some time with the people you are being trained to lead! Some civilian universities have alternated practicums and academics with great success. Perhaps consider Commissioning (if MOC requirements are met). Perhaps leave the Academic stream for SERVICE! After the Third Academic Year the summer hiatus could be a mini version of the Practicum Year.

    Any change should be considered on its contribution to the effectiveness of producing DEFENSE FOR CANADA!

  • 4588 ROBERT LOUIS KOMPF

    December 13, 2019 at 2:18 am

    Is that all there is?
    Has anyone else read Jim’s paper?
    Does anyone have a thought or an opinion?
    Does anyone care?
    Oh! I get it. Two options.
    A. Kompf’s notion provides a perfect solution that precludes further comment.
    OR
    B. The present academic heavy fulfilment of the Four Pillars is perfect and defies comment.
    OR
    Back to searching for someone . . . anyone who cares!
    OR
    So much time! So little to do!