Ex-Cadets & more in the News

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  • Vet pushing for PTSD service dog expenses to be covered

  • Indigenous military members endure ‘systemic’ racism, report claims

  • Tory leadership hopeful O’Toole promises tax help for students, young workers

  • Canadian NORAD Region names Santa’s escort pilots and trackers

  • Mapping out a future for Canada’s special operations forces

  • OAS Secretary General awarded 10 influential Hispanics Canadians

  • Police Shooting Ranges

  • 24829 Suhan Kwon: Participation at the 97th Korea (South) National Sports Festival

  • Snowbirds set 2017 schedule

Read More…

Vet pushing for PTSD service dog expenses to be covered

13855 Medric Cousineau

Article (short video)

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Indigenous military members endure ‘systemic’ racism, report claims

12966 Marquis Hainse

Article

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Tory leadership hopeful O’Toole promises tax help for students, young workers

19894 Erin O’Toole

Article

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Canadian NORAD Region names Santa’s escort pilots and trackers

18508 William Radiff  & 25332 Frédéric Létourneau

Article

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Mapping out a future for Canada’s special operations forces

Dr. Christian Leuprecht & 22395 Hans Christian Breede

Article

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OAS Secretary General awarded 10 influential Hispanics Canadians

18866 Eva Martinez (Spa) – Vice President, Women in Aerospace Canada Included in the Group of 10

Article

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Police Shooting Ranges

E1190 PAUL ROMEO

Article

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Snowbirds set 2017 schedule – here is a list of where they will be

Article

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24829 Suhan Kwon: Participation at the 97th Korea (South) National Sports Festival

The 97th Korea Sports Festival took place from 7 to 13 October 2016 throughout the province of Chungcheong, South Korea. The Korea Sports Festival is recognized as the “Olympics of South Korea.” Competitors at the Festival , including Olympic athletes, compete to be selected in the South Korean national team.

The preparation to secure a spot for the 97th Korea Sports Festival in Taekwondo was a challenging experience. Like so many other amateur athletes, I had to balance my training schedule with work and academics. Fortunately, the fast-paced nature of the military lifestyle, especially varsity Taekwondo experience during my undergraduate years at the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada helped prepare me for the demands of training. The most grueling part was commuting 2.5 hours back and forth from London Ontario to Toronto and Niagara Falls in order to train with my coach and other fellow Korean Canadian Athletic Association (KCAA) athletes throughout the week after work. After being selected by the KCAA to compete in the plus 80kg heavyweight athlete in South Korea, surviving multiple selection processes, I was advised by the 4th Canadian Division PSP staff on the “Out Service Sports Competition” program, which helped me to fund my participation at the 97th Korea (South) National Sports Festival.

The opening ceremony started with the passing of 24,811 athletes from all provinces of South Korea, with an additional 1,300 foreign Koreans. The stadium was full of spectators including the South Korean president and South Korean Olympic athletes.

Taekwondo, being the national sport of Korea, was one of the toughest sports divisions at the Sports Festival. Unlike in the past where points were awarded based on assessment from the referees, the scoring system changed from analogue to an electronic scoring system utilizing magnetised socks and impact sensors in body and head protectors. As a Taekwondo fighter who has spent majority of the time competing in the analogue scoring system, it was difficult to adjust to the modern electronic system as the new technology has placed precision over strength in the rules of the game. This significantly affected my strategies and techniques.

Regardless of the changes in the scoring system, I had to constantly change my fighting tactics as I continued to sustain minor injuries from clashing legs. After securing a victory over a competitor from the Philippines, I was competing against an American fighter for the bronze-medal match. Despite leading the match with a point, the American caught up in the later rounds as my hamstring injury impeded my range of motion. Even though I missed out on the bronze medal, I was happy to witness South Korean Rio 2016 Olympic athletes, including the women’s 46kg gold-medalist, Kim So-hui, and men’s 58kg bronze-medalist, Kim Tae-hun, compete and win gold at the Sports Festival.

The Canadian team placed third amongst the 17 foreign countries with a gold and bronze medal. Japan placed first with nine gold, three silver, and three bronze. The second place went to the U.S. with four gold, two silver, and five bronze. As a South Korean born Canadian who immigrated to Canada at the age of 9, it was a great honor to return to my motherland and represent Canada amongst other fellow Koreans in the 97thNational Sports Festival.

I would like to thank the PSP staff Canadian Armed Forces Taekwondo Association (CAFTA) for their guidance and support.