Ex-Cadets & More in the News

Canadian general sees ‘deeper progress’

“Why do you have a military? It’s so you can make places as bad and as difficult as this better,” he said.

“If we didn’t go to places where people die to do better, we’d be addressing the easy things. We’d probably be addressing the challenges that could fix themselves.”

15696 Brigadier-General Jonathan Vance (RRMC 1986)

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The coldest front in the Cold War

“When the wind came off the Siberian Plain and whistled down, my God, I don’t think there’s any clothing in the world that can stop that,” he said. “Korea was the coldest place I’ve ever been. Also the hottest.”

3003 Robert Peacock (RRMC 1952)

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From guns to pencil pushers

“What we would regard as corruption (but which has been part of Afghan life for centuries) is endemic in Afghanistan, and in the Afghan National Police.”

12632 Maj.-Gen. Mike Ward (RMC 1980)

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Fleet passes royal muster

“This ship has done a great deal of preparation as have they all and it’s very nice to have the day come off as an absolute success,” Vice-Admiral Dean McFadden, commander of Canada’s navy, said aboard St. John’s, which carried the Queen and other dignitaries through the harbour.

11919 Vice-Admiral Dean McFadden, Chief of the Maritime Staff (RRMC 1978)

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Stern warnings from fleet security

“It will be pretty clear. There are lots of those rigid-hull inflatable boats around, so basically all the measures will be taken to keep people back as far as they can. But the rule of thumb is to stay back 300 yards.”

20319 Maj. Paul Doucette, a Defence Department spokesman (RMC 1997)

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Top officer says future is bright for CFB Gagetown

“I can’t imagine as the army cycle goes up and down in the coming years and decades that the base will not be affected by that. If the army shrinks, I am sure the base will shrink somewhat. If the army expands, than I am sure we will expand somewhat.”

14069 Michael Pearson (RMC 1983)

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Excellence in the Defence Team

The team as a whole oversaw the deployment of nearly 2 000 CF and civilian personnel to Haïti and the evacuation of about 5 000 Canadians and Haïtian children. Here at home, they managed the hundreds of volunteers, liaised with families and addressed complex adoption issues.

Captain Troy Grant and Captain Hugo Boilard were honoured to receive the award for their contributions to the team.

M0852 Captain Troy Grant (RMC 2003)

22254 Captain Hugo Boilard (RMC 2002)

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A fleet-of-foot competitor

“I had been hoping to beat my personal best distance for that time frame, but the weather conditions foiled my plan,” Maj Barteaux said. “The course was soaked and there was a wind coming off the water, which made running conditions more challenging.”

11338 Major Bruce Barteaux (RMC 1978)

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Trini engineer earns Canadian accolades

BY ANGELA PIDDUCK Sunday, July 4 2010

Michaelle Jean, Governor General of Canada, recently presented the Governor General’s Gold Medal for highest academic standing in a graduate degree programme in her institution, to Trinidadian, Aba Bowles-Mortley, at the 87th Convocation of the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ontario.

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Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada, announced June 30, 2010 74 new appointments to the Order of Canada. Those with links to the Royal Military Colleges include:

Willard S. Boyle, C.C. Companion of the Order of Canada: For his contributions to the field of physics, notably for co-developing an imaging semiconductor circuit, known as the charge-coupled device, that has become a keystone technology in the field of astronomy. He spent two years teaching physics at the Royal Military College of Canada

Gwynne Dyer, O.C. Officer of the Order of Canada: For his contributions as a columnist, documentary producer, broadcaster and author. Gwynne Dyer has served in the Canadian, British and American navies. He holds a Ph.D. in war studies from the University of London, has taught at Sandhurst and served on the Board of Governors of Canada’s Royal Military College. Dyer writes a syndicated column that appears in more than 175 newspapers around the world.

http://www.gg.ca/document.aspx?id=13725