Golden Oldies

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RMC 1957

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RMC 1980

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RMC 1975

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CMR 1995

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RMC 1968

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RMC 1987

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RMC 1970

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RMC 1963

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RMC 2000

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RMC 1991

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RRMC 1962

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RMC 1987

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RMC 2012

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CMR 1969

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RMC 1976

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RMC 1999

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RRMC 1969

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RMC 1983

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RMC 1974

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Caption: Potential Admirals, Generals and Air Marshals of Tomorrow  – RMC 1948 and the first 100

The Canadian Services Colleges are established to train officers for the Active and Reserve forces of the Navy, Army and Air Force.  Cadets specify their preference for a particular service by the middle of their first year, although their basic training is the same for the four-year course, cadets spend the summer term with the service of their choice.   Shown here are three typical cadets at Royal Military College, Kingston, Ont.   They are left to right:   P.E. Boivin, (2448 Aylwin)  Montreal;  J.D. Reid,  (24 Dunlop St.)  Barrie, Ont., and J.L. Lachance,  (267 Moisan St.)  Drummondville.    Boivin is an Air Force Cadet,  Reid has selected the Army for his career and Lachance will join the navy on graduation.

RMC is one of Canada’s two Services Colleges, training future officers for the three Armed Services.   The other college is Royal Roads, near Victoria, B.C.   The first two years of the four-year course may be taken at either college, but the last two must be taken at RMC in Kingston.   (Canadian Army Photo)

3 Comments

  • Jim Griffin

    February 11, 2019 at 5:01 pm

    I did not have the pleasure of knowing Chief Pitt, but that was a great thing for the class to honour him on his retirement. Also nice to see the photo of PO Perron at CMR. In my year at RMC (1959-60) I remember him well. I had never done a handspring over a horse in my life and was so concerned with the procedure of PO’s command “First two!”, then “Next” – getting to my feet at ease, coming to attention, then doubling off to do the handspring — next thing I knew I was over the horse or box and on my feet again. I even used the technique myself when teaching Phys Ed!

  • Jim Vanstone

    February 11, 2019 at 7:34 pm

    Over the years, I have often told the story of the importance of Chief Pitt’s expression “shit or bust” in committing oneself fully to a task. I have vivid memories of preparing to vault over a horse lengthwise, where you had to leap over the near end of the horse and reach far out and place your hands on the far end of the horse before completing a backflip. As a young male, you naturally were concerned about leaving a vital part of your appendage on the near end of the horse as you attempted this maneuver. Invariably, as you were charging towards the horse you would hear Chief Pitt shout “shit or bust”. I always thank Chief Pitt’s encouragement for preventing me from disaster.

  • Mike Kennedy #12570

    February 13, 2019 at 9:37 pm

    Does anyone know who the guard commander is in the photo from 1976 with General Turner in the background ? The one bar, the absence of any sash, and the sleeve adornment all indicate he was a third-year cadet at the time the photo was taken. Looking closely at the photo, I believe he was Peter Loggie, who later became CWTO in 1976-77. He was Armoured Corps, and joined the British Army after graduation.