Half-Way Point for Exams; Cadets Attend Army Ball

 

Above: Moments before the buzzer sounds, cadets settle in for a 3 hour exam.

There’s a Light at the End of the Tunnel, Sort of…

Article by 25366 NCdt (IV) Mike Shewfelt

This past Saturday morning wrapped up the first of two weeks of exams for the Cadet Wing, and the halls of RMC have been quiet as cadets prepared for the next day’s tests, or recovered from that day’s mental exertions. For the Fourth Years, this is the last big hurdle before Graduation, now less than a month away. For the other years, this will be their last taste of academics before they transition into Environmental Preparatory Training, Graduation Parade, leave, and summer training. All that will have to wait, though, as there is still one more week of exams to go (unless you’re an Arts student, in which case you’re probably finished already). The Wing is not done yet, but the light at the end of the tunnel is starting to grow a little brighter.

Above left: Cadets run a gauntlet of Mayflies on their way to the exam hall.

Above right: They’re confident now… Cadets pass the Wall of Honor on their way to their doom (or exam).

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Cadets Clink Glasses at Army Ball

By: 25337 Chris Manning

On Sunday April 15th, ten officer cadets from the Royal Military College were privileged with an opportunity to attend the 2012 Army Ball in Gatineau. The cadets left RMC at 1500 on Saturday afternoon in order to arrive for cocktails at 1800 with an impressive array of the senior leadership of the Army. The ball took place Casino Lac Leamy, where all the stops were pulled to ensure an entertaining evening. After watching the Royal Canadian Regiment Demonstration Team rappel into the dining hall, the cadets enjoyed a delicious multi-course meal. The group was able to socialize with representatives from the EllisDon Corporation, who graciously footed the bill for the cadets’ pricey meal. Cadets may notice signage around the college representing EllisDon are the Construction Managers for the Sawyer and Girouard Retrofit Project spanning 2009-2016.

One inspirational moment of the evening was the presentation of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal to 60 deserving soldiers from across the Canadian Forces. The Governor General, His Excellency the Right Honorable David Johnston, was on scene to present the medals and did so with impressive speed and dexterity. Aside from the presentation of medals, the Chief of Land Staff, Lieutenant-General Devlin, proudly recognized the Army Sergeant Major, Chief Warrant Officer Moretti, for his service as he prepares to end his term as the Army’s top NCO. The entire ballroom did not take long getting to its feet for a long standing ovation. The Sergeant Major had kind words for the officer cadets, in what truly was a “great day to be in the Army.”

 

Elèves-Officiers trinquent au Bal de l’Armée

Par: 25337 Chris Manning

Traduit par: 25038 Keven Morin

Dimanche le 15 avril, dix élèves-officiers du Collège Militaire Royal du Canada ont eu le privilège de participer au Bal de l’Armée à Gatineau. Les élèves-officiers ont quittés le CMR à 1500 heures samedi après-midi afin d’arriver à temps pour les cocktails de 1800 heures ou était réunis une important partie des officiers seniors de l’Armée. Le bal se déroulait au Casino du Lac Leamy où tout avait été mis en œuvre afin d’assurer aux invités une soirée des plus agréables. Après avoir vue l’équipe de démonstration du Royal Canadian Regiment faire une descente en rappel jusqu’à la salle de réception, les élèves-officiers se sont fait servir un délicieux repas avec de multiples services. Le groupe a aussi eu la chance de discuter avec les représentants de la corporation EllisDon, qui ont gracieusement acceptés de payer pour le repas dispendieux des élèves-officiers présents. Les élèves-officiers auront sûrement remarqués les affiches du groupe EllisDon au collège.

L’un des moments les plus inspirants de la soirée fut la présentation de la médaille pour le jubilé de diamants de la reine à 60 membres méritants des Forces Canadiennes. Le Gouverneur Générale, Son Excellence l’Honorable David Johnston, était présent afin de distribuer les médailles avec une vitesse et une précision remarquables. Mis-à-part la présentation de médailles, le Chef d’état-major de l’Armée de terre, le Lieutenant-général Peter Devlin, a fièrement souligner le service du Sergent Major de l’Armée, Adjudant-chef Moretti, alors qu’il se prépare à terminer son affectation à la plus haute position de S-O de l’armée. La salle entière n’a pas tardée à se lever afin de lui offrir une longue ovation debout. Le Sergent Major a ensuite prononcé quelques mots encouragent pour les élèves-officiers, en ce qui fut réellement « un jour fantastique pour faire partie de l’armée ».

3 Comments

  • 2908 MGen A Pickering, CMM, CD (Ret'd))

    April 23, 2012 at 3:59 pm

    Passing the Wall of Honour photo: I notice cadets are not in step and more than one is looking at the ground, a common fault. I do not see pride in self or in the College demonstrated. Unfotunately, this casual walking about the College is noted also in military members of the staff, not a good example to cadets. I hope next year’s seniors will show some leadership in this area. Show some pride other than on parade!!

  • Helga Grodzinski

    April 23, 2012 at 7:10 pm

    I was very happy to see the cadets at the Army Ball. Their scarlets blended in quite nicely with all the Army mess kits and their presence lowered considerably the median age of those present–which is a good thing! I hope to see cadets again next year (and I hope they are permitted to stick around a bit longer in order to show the rest of us the latest way to dance!)
    15566 Helga Grodzinski (’86)

  • Helga Grodzinski

    April 23, 2012 at 7:21 pm

    PS. I do wonder how today’s cadets (and other university students), raised in an age of computers and social media, in which penmanship is no longer taught in schools, and who have never hand-written anything longer than their own names, manage to sit in an exam hall and write longhand for three hours! As difficult as it must be for them, I do not envy the profs who are required to decipher the results!
    Cheers,
    15566 Helga Grodzinski