T.D.V. and What It Means to You

T.D.V.

By: WJO

Over the past number of weeks we have had the opportunity to attend a few functions with Cadets and Ex-Cadets in attendance. Invariably during the course of a Q&A or just during casual chit-chat – TDV and what it means came up quite often.

We have observed Alumni put the question to III & IV Years – just as often we have witnessed Cadets from all years look both Ex Cadets and members of the Old Brigade straight in the eye – with the same question. This quite frankly caught us by surprise.

We can recall generally the replies from both young and old. However, what sticks out in our mind and what caught our attention was the different interpretations of TDV.

The intention of this short article is not to analyze the replies.

What we did was refer to the Cadet Handbook.

The question to anyone with a College number.  Does this fit your definition of TDV?

 

Truth is the quality of an officer to speak and act in a straightforward way without prevarication, and certainly without being evasive, misleading or lying. Dishonesty is the mechanism that breaks down the integrity of an officer. If an officer lacks integrity, his (her) followers will recognize that he/she is a failure as a leader, and once the trust of his/her subordinates is lost, he/she will find it nearly impossible to win it back.

Duty is the internal obligation to do what one knows to be right, whether by rule, regulation, law or moral code. It makes no difference whether or not anyone knows you do it, or whether or not it falls within the scope of your official duties. Every officer must be mindful of the regulations he/she serves under, and the duties and responsibilities he/she must discharge. If in a position of command or seniority, he/she must be equally mindful of the actions of his/her subordinates.

Valour is the moral strength required to perform one’s duties honestly. It is not physical courage. Very few will have the opportunity to display a disregard for their personal safety under hazardous conditions. Rather, valour is the concept that bridges the ideas of truth and duty. It is the moral courage to live honestly and to do one’s duties, no matter the circumstances.

Source – Cadet Handbook p,15

 

One Comment

  • Karl Scharnitzky 10999

    April 29, 2011 at 8:56 am

    I have regarded TDV to be my life motto; my children even throw it at me periodically to prove they are right!
    I always told them TDV because: Truth, above all. Duty is our responsibility to family, Country, Queen and many other areas in our lives. Valour is the courage needed to hold up the first two.
    Not very different from the original definitions but simplified for life and family.
    Having served me well these 35 years (Class of 76), I now have it tattooed on my arm.