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Where are they now?

12591 Mr Stephen Murray (RMC ‘80) has been Manager Information Management at the City of Ottawa since October 2005 after having served more than 25 years with the Canadian Army. From July 1996 to July 2000he served at the NATO Consultation, Command and Control Agency (NC3A) in Brussels, Belgium as Project Manager for Network Management and Satellite Control projects. Upon his return to Canada he worked on communications interoperability issues with Australian, United States and United Kingdom coalition forces. Before accepting the position with the City of Ottawa he spent two years developing IM/IT Investment Management policy and practises within DND for ADM (Material). Mr. Murray has a B. Eng Mgt in industrial engineering from the Royal Military College and a M.A. Sc. in management sciences from the University of Waterloo.
http://www.governmentevents.ca/arma2007/agenda.php

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Veterans Ombudsman 12723 PB Stogran (RRMC RMC ’80), Veterans Ombudsman, launched what he called a “Leave Nobody Behind” campaign to ensure that ex-service personnel in need or in trouble have a source to consult or get help. “We don’t leave our wounded on the battlefield, so injured veterans should not be left to care for themselves. I will leave nobody behind . . . Everyone should feel they can come to us on any matter that impacts on the veteran community, and be confident we will follow up.”

Lt Col Pat Stogran commanded 3rd Battalion PPCLI Battalion Battle Group in Afghanistan, 2002.

The following article is reprinted from a column written for the July 7 edition of the Toronto Sun by Peter Worthington, a founding editor of the Toronto Sun and Sun newspaper chain. Worthington served in World War Two as the youngest officer in the Royal Canadian Navy Fleet Air Arm. He subsequently served in Korea as a platoon commander with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry and later as an air
observer attached with the US Air Force Mosquito Squadron.

Veterans Ombudsman vows to “Leave Nobody Behind”

Anyone who works in the media knows of the volume of complaints that
come in from veterans who feel they are being hard-done by, ignored
by the country that once vowed to look after them, and feel they have
no place to turn for help.
Until last Remembrance Day (Nov.11), Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC)
had no ombudsman to whom vets with beefs could appeal.

That was the day that retired Col. Pat Stogran, a no-nonsense soldier
who commanded the Princess Pats when they first went to Afghanistan
in 2002, took over as the first Ombudsman for Veterans Affairs.

To some, a veterans ombudsman was long overdue; to others a dubious
promise.

In June, Stogran launched what he called a “Leave Nobody Behind”
campaign to ensure that ex-service personnel in need or in trouble
have a source to consult or get help.

We’ve heard similar intentions before. What makes this somewhat
different is Stogran. In Afghanistan, he was the first battle
commander since the Korean war and earned the reputation of being a
straight shooter, a blunt talker, a guy who stood up for his troops.

He brings this reputation to his job as ombudsman: “We don’t leave
our wounded on the battlefield, so injured veterans should not be
left to care for themselves. I will leave nobody behind . . .

Everyone should feel they can come to us on any matter that impacts
on the veteran community, and be confident we will follow up.”

Noble words. As a soldier, Stogran’s been around the hoop: platoon
commander, company commander, a tour with the Airborne Regiment,
exercises in Norway, Mountain training, urban warfare training, Staff
College, posted to serve with the Australians, Mentioned-in
Dispatches for courage under fire as a military observer in Bosnia.

His was a military career in which he did a little bit of everything –
a solid resume for an ombudsman.

The “Leave Nobody Behind” campaign brings to mind retired Warrant
Officer Matt Stopford, who was not only “left behind” but was
persecuted by the military when he returned from the Balkans and not
told of poison attempts by his own men who considered him too gung-ho.

Blind in on eye and with internal ailments the Mayo Clinic said had
been ignored too long for a cure, Stopford (Mentioned-in-Dispatches
for leadership in the Medak Pocket fight) had to sue the army for
justice.

Former Defence Minister Gordon O’Connor got Stopford a financial
settlement and an apology for the army’s negligence – but only after
retired Col. Michel Drapeau, now a lawyer, argued on Stopford’s
behalf.

This is the sort of thing Stogran wants short-circuted.

He was recently involved in the case of Ken Barwise, a hero of the
battle of Kapyong in Korea, whose stepdaughter was saddled with his
funeral costs that Cliff Chadderton’s War Amps ultimately picked up.

Stogran has met with Chadderton, to ensure that future cases like
Barwise’s don’t occur. Too many fall through the cracks – including
today’s wounded from Afghanistan.

The most notable case was that of Major Bruce Henwood, who lost both
legs to a mine in Bosnia and found his army life insurance was really
an income insurance, and worthless. His campaign eventually led to
cash settlements for soldiers losing limbs while on active service.
No ombudsman’s help in those days.

Stogran says his toughest job may be saying “No” to pleas that fall
outside his mandate – such as reviewing decisions already made by the
Veterans Review and Appeal Board, or court decisions. And frivolous
bids for benefits – not unknown for soldiers.

Still, there is no shortage of vets with valid grievances.

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